0
$\begingroup$

Madrid banned oil based cars at the center. Some people from Madrid that lives at the periphery are arguing they are receiving center's pollution, while the center is clean and free to park for rich that can pay an electrical car. I want to correctly answer them, so I am searching an answer from a meteorologist to point the disgusted people on spanish newspapers.

Can I ask something like "If you limit driving on the center of a city, does the periphery absorve the pollution that is supossed to be removed from the city?"

Or it would be off-topic as based in demography?

| |
$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

Ultimately the question is about dispersal of air pollution within a localized region. I think this would be on topic. My concern though, is would the question be too broad, or complex?

Factors that would affect the dispersal of air pollution would include:

  • Types and numbers of pollution sources
  • Concentration of pollutants emitted
  • Types of pollutants emitted: gases, particles (such as soot/carbon)
  • Surface topography and the effect of buildings, forested regions, grass lands etc. on airflow
  • Prevailing wind directions
  • Strength of winds
  • Duration of winds
  • Effects of humidity
  • Meteorological features such as temperature inversions and cloud ceilings
  • Computer modelling parameters
| |
$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks. It looks too broad. I guess to correctly explain this issue a study of some pages is needed and not a short answer. $\endgroup$ – user12525 Jul 25 '19 at 10:14
0
$\begingroup$

Looking at it from a fundamental level: I assume that the peripheral residents' concern is based on the idea that the people who would have driven into the middle will instead park around the edge.

That obviously won't happen universally - some will use other modes of transport, and some will use electric vehicles - but even assuming that it did, then where's the extra pollution coming from? The people who are driving into the centre would be driving through the periphery anyway to get there. They might spend longer there, and at lower speeds, if they are having to look for somewhere to park, so that might be a factor.

So it seems to me that there might (or might not) be an increase in pollution at a very local level - but there will be dramatically decreased pollution at city scale. And hence the factors mentioned in the other answer would be needed to answer how it works out. How it does work out will probably be different for different pollutants, too.

| |
$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Er, sorry, just realised this is on meta. So my meta answer is that parts of this, at least, are on topic - the parts that Fred mentioned ;-) $\endgroup$ – Semidiurnal Simon Jul 24 '19 at 18:28
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks. I may point them here just to tell scientists say there will be dramatically decreased pollution at city scale. But well anyhow we won the battle. The rigth wanted to reopen the center, but European Union has said they need to leave it closed. $\endgroup$ – user12525 Jul 25 '19 at 10:13
  • $\begingroup$ The main issue is with NO2 and yes the norm reduced it at city scale, maybe not at all the neighbourhoods as you say. $\endgroup$ – user12525 Jul 25 '19 at 10:21

You must log in to answer this question.